Custom Sharpening - Bevel-ups and Jack Planes - Paul.

Jack plane blade angle

Veritas PM-V11 Plane Blade February 6, 2013 By Richard Maguire 15 Comments I was fortunate enough to get my hands on a new Veritas PM-V11 plane blade last year (the nice chaps at Veritas; Steve and Wally kindly dropped one at my bench at last years European Woodworking Show).

Jack plane blade angle

I have a Veritas low angle jack, low angle jointer, smoothing, low angle block, and some specialty planes. I went with them for the PM-V11 blades. I'm very happy with all of them and the PM-V11 REALLY holds up a long time. Lie Nielsen would be my other choice. My third choice would be a vintage Stanley with a new blade. All are lifetime tools. I don't think I consider any others except maybe.

Jack plane blade angle

The Jack Plane EKO is made as an economic wooden plane (economic alternative to the Jack Plane), the body, sole and foot are made of solid beech. The Jack Plane has a blade with a chip breaker and is used for fine smoothening or finishing surfaces. The bed angle is 45 degrees. The chip breaker breaks chips from the planed material and removes them away from the planed surface. The plane is.

Jack plane blade angle

The photo at top shows a moderately cambered jack plane blade projection. Click on it to see a larger version. Adjust the blade for lateral balance with the lever, Norris style adjuster, or hammer, depending on the type of plane. Usually, this is easier to observe and manage with a substantial overall blade projection, which you can then back off to a shallow cutting depth. For a smoothing.

Jack plane blade angle

A typical smoothing plane is seen opposite and below. It is used for general planing of wood and is a smaller version of a jack plane. The normal purpose of the larger jack plane (seen below) is to level the edge of a piece of wood (called producing a straight edge). When preparing a length of wood a straight edge and straight side are needed.

Jack plane blade angle

Sharpening and the low angle jack. For christmas I got a Veritas low angle jack plane with the PM-V11 steel at a 25 degree angle. Now i had just recently got the Mk II honing guide. I'm wondering whether I should hone the blade to a higher angle. Currently I use this plane as my all around plane (mainly because it is my only one) so I joint and smooth and such with it. I notice I get tear out.

Jack plane blade angle

I would recommend buying a new Lie-Nielsen No. 62 Low Angle Jack Plane (bevel up), which is a remake of the hard-to-find antique Stanley No. 62 Low Angle Jack Plane. It can be used as a Jack plane for rough stock removal (if you buy a separate “ toothed iron ” and also open the mouth wider), as a smoothing plane, and as a jointer plane (again, for boards less than three times its length).

Jack plane blade angle

Commonly called a jack plane, the No. 5 is the most common plane out there. If a pre-war homeowner bought one plane, it was most likely a jack plane. Why? Well the jack plane can be set up to do almost any job. Camber the iron and it can be a fore plane for removing stock. Set it up with a straight iron or a slightly cambered iron and it can be.

Jack plane blade angle

Low Angle Jack Plane. Patterned after the Stanley No. 62, the Low Angle Jack Plane is one of our most versatile and outstanding planes. The massive blade is set bevel-up in the milled bed at 12 Degrees, giving you maximum support of the cutting edge and a low angle of attack. The precise depth adjuster, moveable shoe for adjustment of the mouth.

Jack plane blade angle

The block plane required only a bit of sole lapping because of a crown. The No. 4’s chip breaker needed some fettling to fit better to its blade. The low-angle jack’s blade had a noticeable back bevel; and, when the blade was set parallel to the sole, it was skewed relative to the adjustable toe. But the plane still performed quite well.

Jack plane blade angle

A block plane is a small metal-bodied woodworking hand plane which typically has the blade bedded at a lower angle than other planes, with the bevel up. It is designed to cut end grain and do touchup or finish work. It is typically small enough to be used with one hand. Origin. According to Patrick's Stanley Blood and Gore, Stanley marketing materials describe the origin of the name of this.